Naked in the Park

Tuesday, October 21, 2014
And now Klaus is apparently running off to go and save Sunny. In the books of course it is Violet, but I know that Hollywood prefers its female actresses to do very little.

Lemony Snicket, A Series of Unfortunate Events audio commentary (via literatureloveaffair)

genderhaunt

(via thechosenneville)

satanstolemyvirginity:

Actually me

(Source: c-mines)

durnesque-esque:

delightfullyauburn:

gimpnelly:

askmaridee:

I took a couple of hours out of my day to be on a panel for Young Author’s Day, an event put on by the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association. I was invited to join by John Lustig, who I feel very lucky to call my friend and mentor. We answered the usual questions about the writing process and how we broke into comics, but I was even more intrigued by the audience. Notice something about them?
Yeah. GIRLS. Very. Young. Girls.
So I asked THEM some questions. “How many of you read comics?”
All hands went up.
"How many of you want to make comics some day?"
Most of the hands went up.
Here’s where it really got interesting. “How many of you BUY comics?”
Only one hand raised. I asked her where she buys her comics. She said, “At the comic book store.”
"Do you have a comic book store you like going to?" I asked.
She hesitated. “It’s complicated.”
That’s 10 year-old speak for “I have to go there to get comics but the store makes me uncomfortable.” The rest of them read webcomics. None of them had heard of Comixology before, but they knew all about it by the time the panel was over. What comic would they like to see most? Minecraft. Only Steve needs to be a girl.
It was a fascinating experience, especially in the wake of this article detailing why girls in the 1980s (like me and one of the moms nodding eagerly in the audience) stopped buying comics for 20 years.
The future of comics is bright indeed.

This is absolutely wonderful.

as a comic-book buying, reading, and loving girl - fantastic! :) 

Fantastic… but also sad. I’m grateful to Comixology, as it’s allowing me to get into comics too, but sad that big and little girls alike are too afraid of the atmosphere of a real comic book store. 

durnesque-esque:

delightfullyauburn:

gimpnelly:

askmaridee:

I took a couple of hours out of my day to be on a panel for Young Author’s Day, an event put on by the Pacific Northwest Writer’s Association. I was invited to join by John Lustig, who I feel very lucky to call my friend and mentor. We answered the usual questions about the writing process and how we broke into comics, but I was even more intrigued by the audience. Notice something about them?

Yeah. GIRLS. Very. Young. Girls.

So I asked THEM some questions. “How many of you read comics?”

All hands went up.

"How many of you want to make comics some day?"

Most of the hands went up.

Here’s where it really got interesting. “How many of you BUY comics?”

Only one hand raised. I asked her where she buys her comics. She said, “At the comic book store.”

"Do you have a comic book store you like going to?" I asked.

She hesitated. “It’s complicated.”

That’s 10 year-old speak for “I have to go there to get comics but the store makes me uncomfortable.” The rest of them read webcomics. None of them had heard of Comixology before, but they knew all about it by the time the panel was over. What comic would they like to see most? Minecraft. Only Steve needs to be a girl.

It was a fascinating experience, especially in the wake of this article detailing why girls in the 1980s (like me and one of the moms nodding eagerly in the audience) stopped buying comics for 20 years.

The future of comics is bright indeed.

This is absolutely wonderful.

as a comic-book buying, reading, and loving girl - fantastic! :) 

Fantastic… but also sad. I’m grateful to Comixology, as it’s allowing me to get into comics too, but sad that big and little girls alike are too afraid of the atmosphere of a real comic book store. 

  • Me: batman probably could have done a lot more good for Gotham by devoting all his time to running Wayne enterprises.
  • BF: yeah. But not nearly as satisfying.
  • Me: it wouldn't make for a very good comic book.
  • BF: who wants to read the Adventures of a Briefcase Bruce?
  • Me: ...well, now I do.
Monday, October 20, 2014

ripppedfuel:

I love the fact that Faith could literally get out of jail ANY FUCKING TIME but she didn’t because she wanted to do the right thing for herself and because of Angel and Buffy one of the most amazing redemption stories you’ll even see on tv

And she only left because Angel saved her life and he needed her before Angelus did something he couldnt come back from. Their friendship man, they just got each other on a different kind of level.

Faith did a lot of really problematic shit. a lot. and she is one of the few characters who ‘went evil’ who never really gets a fully off the hook  for it in the show. But she tries, my god does she try, to be better and do good and turn it around.

and then, at the end of it, She gets Buffy’s trust - and respect…and man…feels.

Faith Lehane. Buffy might be my hero, but Faith is my girl.

(Source: atwoods)

Sunday, October 19, 2014

e-n-t-p:

I want to see if there is any correlation between self esteem and MBTI. Please comment with your type and a rate of your self esteem on a scale of 1-10, 10 being highest and 1 being lowest. Thank you~

8-9… Entp. It would be higher, but i don’t have the attention span to commit to raising my self esteem for very long.

A researcher tells the following story about her own experience of discovering the seriousness with which young children take gender stereotypes. While interviewing 3 to 6 year olds about their career aspirations, she asked each of them what they would want to be when they grew up if they were members of the opposite sex. Their responses showed that not only did most of the children choose careers that fit the stereotypes of the other gender but also that their perceptions of the limitations imposed by gender were sometimes quite extreme. One little girl confided with a sigh that her true ambition was to fly like a bird, but she could never do it because she was not a boy! One little boy put his hands on his head, sighed deeply, and said helplessly that if he were a girl he would have to grow up and be nothing (Beuf, 1974 as cited by Lips, 2008, p. 401).

holy fucking shit i just

that last line

(via ireandmaliss)

Saturday, October 18, 2014
pixiebutterandjelly:

Perfect way to.explain adulthood.

pixiebutterandjelly:

Perfect way to.explain adulthood.

(Source: juststaywhelmed)

Friday, October 17, 2014
hellyeahsupermanandwonderwoman:

Wonder Woman by Stephanie Hans

hellyeahsupermanandwonderwoman:

Wonder Woman by Stephanie Hans